Lupus Australia, Queensland Inc

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GI AND THE MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES

Pamela J Holdsworth J.P. B. Ap.Sc., Dip Ed Grad.Dip. Nutrition & Dietetics, A.P.D. Specialist Medical Centre Unit A17-1 Rivage Royale 11 Shire Road, Mt Gravatt Central QLD 4122 Southport QLD 4125 Tel: (07) 3343 2578 Tel: (07) 5571 2309 Mobile: 0402 051 287 Fax: (07) 5561 1114 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Research shows that the type of CHO [the GI] accounts for around 90% of the effect of food on blood glucose. When originally developed, GI was designed to be used in conjunction with CHO exchanges, or the like, to assist people to more evenly distribute their CHO intake throughout the day and to improve BGL control. Nine reasons which support the use of GI in the management of diabetes include:

1.Low GI foods and meals lead to smaller fluctuations in blood glucose levels compared to high GI equivalents.

2.Low GI diets improve glycated haemoglobin as much as many diabetic medications.

3.Low GI diets improve glycated haemoglobin without the risk of having a hypo or other side effect.

4.Low GI diets improve the body’s ability to use insulin.

5.Low GI diets improve the common risks for heart and blood vessel disease.

6.Low GI diets may also improve the ability to lose more body fat and to conserve lean muscle.

7.May also improve one’s ability to lose weight as they assist in feeling fuller for longer.

8.Low GI diets are sustainable.

9.Low GI diets are supported by Diabetes organisations from around the world including Diabetes UK, the European Association for the study of Diabetes, the Canada Diabetes Association and the American Diabetes Association.

To achieve a low GI diet you should include at least one low GI food at each meal or snack. Some good low GI foods are listed below: Pasta, Basmati or Doongara rice, milk, yoghurt, ice cream, sweet potato, carrot, peas, corn and fruit. Gram for gram…sugars do not aggravate blood glucose levels more than most starches That is, most sugars are no worse than most starches with the same amount of Carbohydrate.

PAMELA J. HOLDSWORTH. ABN: 14 811 497 713 Accredited Practising Dietitian Nutritionist

 

Updates

Why are new lupus drugs needed?

What should lupus patients and their families know about Benlysta? WebMD consulted Eric L. Gredinger, MD, chief of rheumatism and immunology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, FDA briefing documents, and the FDA approval announcement.

 

Officially know as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), lupus ia an autoimmune disease. It's relatively common, affecting about one in 1,000 people. But some people with lupus have such mild disease they may never know they have it.

Others have relatively mild disease that can be controlled with current treatments. These include over-the-counter NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, corticosteroids such as prednisone, antimalaria drugs such as hydroxychloroquine, powerful immunosuppressants, and cancer chemotherapies. (Lupus is not caused by malaria and is not a cancer, but malarial drugs and chemotherapies suppress various manifestations of lupus).

Still other patients experience frequent lupus flare-ups and suffer devastating side effects from current treatments. And finally, there are patients with life-threatening lupus, at risk of major organ failure.

In all those cases, the current drugs while not perfect provide a good series of choices,” Greidinger says.

Patients with mild disease may not need treatment, or may be able to keep their symptoms under control with relatively safe antimalaria drugs.

Patients with the most severe disease – including lupus affecting the kidneys or brain – can benefit from more aggressive treatment.

But patients in the middle category are more difficult to treat, Greidinger says. They may not get relief from the safest lupus treatments. But stronger treatments, continued over time, may cause side effects that are worse than a patient's symptoms.

 

 

 

Lupus Booklet


A nineteen page booklet filled with stories and poems written by people who have lupus

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